Tuesday, June 7, 2016

The Clone Wars: Heroes on Both Sides

My friends and I are watching Star Wars: The Clone Wars.  Every Tuesday, we will be featuring an episode from the series which began in 2008 (as opposed to the one that started in 2003).  All are welcome to join us for all or parts of the fun.

Episode: "Heroes on Both Sides"
Series: Star Wars: The Clone Wars
Season 3, Episode 10
Original Air Date: November 19, 2010
via Wookieepedia
There's a push in the Republican senate to increase war funding.  Padmé and her allies, however, advocate for negotiations to end the war.   Ahsoka struggles to follow all of the politics so Padmé takes her under wing.  The two of them arrange for a secret, unsanctioned visit to Raxus, the capital of the Confederacy of Independent Systems.  There, they meet with Mina Bonteri, an old friend of Padmé's, now a Separatist senator.

The Clone Wars is pretty good at exploring its political backdrop and this week's episode in particular provides a new perspective on the Republic's presumed enemy: the Separatists.  I say "presumed" because the whole point of this story is for Ahsoka, and us, to see that the Separatists are not all ruthlessly evil like Dooku and Grievous.  In fact, most of them have legitimate gripes against the Republic and [gasp!] the Jedi.  What we already know, though our heroes don't see it yet, is that the real threat comes from the folks in the middle who are playing both sides: Lott Dod and his fellow profiteers, in this case.

What was it Eisenhower said about the military industrial complex?
via Wookieepedia
While on Raxus, Ahsoka spends most of her time with Lux, Bonteri's son.  At first, she is hostile to him and he doesn't help his own case much when he reveals a physical attraction to her.  But over time, she warms to him and it is through this relationship in particular that we see hope for the future - hope which we already know will be shattered.  Lux will be back in Season 4.
via Wikipedia
Lux is voiced by Jason Spisak.  Spisak was born August 29, 1973 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.  While he has the extensive voice acting resume I've come to expect, he is also an accomplished computer programmer.  He designed something called the Mezzo desktop environment for the Symphony OS Project and also wrote the Laws of Interface Design.  No, I don't entirely understand the previous sentence but if you do, I trust you are suitably impressed by Mr. Spisak.

If you would care to join us for all or part of our travels, sign on to the list below.  Please visit the other participants today.  Next week: "Pursuit of Peace."

 

14 comments:

  1. Oh, Lux. Saw my name there. :P

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  2. The relationship between the Jedi and politics is interesting.

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    1. This episode definitely adds new and interesting wrinkles.

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  3. How interesting to learn that besides voice work he also does programming. That sentence sounded very complex to me. :)
    ~Jess

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    1. I have come across a few folks like this: techies who do the voice acting as a side gig. Not a bad way to pay the bills.

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  4. Liked the idea that there are good and bad people on each side.
    Much like today when so many people feel marginalized.

    cheers, parsnip and thehamish

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    1. And the real problem is the people who profit from conflict, just like in the real world.

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  5. Mostly everyone thinks Darth Vader is dead but I believe Vaders spirit is alive... you'll see.

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    1. I really hope that's not the case. There is so much room for the Star Wars story to grow. I think depending too much on the older characters, especially in what is supposed to be a new generation, would be a mistake.

      That said, you may be right.

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  6. crazy good evil characters never die.

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    1. Or they die spectacularly, like the Wicked Witch of the West!

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